Find the Fun in making your writing SHINE!

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review tips

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I love writing.

Don’t you?

Getting all your thoughts down on paper and out of your head.

No one to say what’s right or wrong

(shut up inner critic now !)

No one to tell you even what to write.

You can be your true self.  You can honour your feelings.

You can be that rebel.  You can try out a new you.

It’s all about you.

What’s not to like?

Ah.  Just one thing.

The editing, the re writing, the structuring..

The call-it-what-you-will thing that you do to make your page of writing make the best sense.

This is when things can lose the fun and I don’t what that to happen to you.

The stream is flowing so let’s not turn it into a trickle!

Let’s keep that stop cock on.

What’s your big idea?  Your mojo?

Be clear on this before you go at your writing with your editors head on.

When you clean up your writing to make it shine remember you are only doing a bit of polishing.

Or light dusting.

Just to make it slide easier into the hands of your reader.

Be sure you do not smash your big idea, your unique take.

This is your gold.

So after a stream of paragraph writing which we have now done in the previous sections.

(We should be looking at 3 paragraphs on the page so far.)

Use these ideas below as a fun system to make them look professional and generally fabulous.

Basically if something is not fun we tend not to do it I find.

So think of this like an Instagram filter on your selfie .. designed to make your work look its best self.

  • We take out weak words to sound strong.
  • We check through grammar.
  • We swap out words that are used more than once.
  • We break long sentences into two.
  • We double check all facts and details.

And this won’t take long.

And it will make a massive difference to how people react to your work.

And YOU deserve that !

Let’s go.

‘Simple subedits

Make your work shine.

Simple subedits

tell your genius it’s time!’

 

1 Take out weak words

Too many flabby words that slow readers down mean they may not make it right down to the bottom.

Readers are used to scanning the internet for what they want.

Some words keep people reading faster than others.

Use this guide to cut out words that may not flow well (look out for repeating the same word too often).

This list may also inspire you to chose a few different words to make the review easier to read.

Hot words –

Fast Easy Quick Simple

 

Power up your page and  scrutinize your writing.  You want to stand out and not weaken your idea.

Certain words and phrases are so commonplace your reader is blind to them like ‘your’ ‘and’ ‘my’ ‘the’.   If you are short of space and you can make sense without these words they can go.

Some weak words you can do without –

  • About –Use “approximately” or a range: Fifteen to twenty people attended.
  • Absolutely essential – Redundant phrase. You don’t need absolutely. Booking is essential
  • Add an additional – Redundant phrase. You don’t need an additional. Ex: They added an additional chorus. Better: They added a chorus.
  • All of – Flabby expression. Drop of. Ex: All of the costumes sparkled. Better: All the costumes sparkled.
  • Anonymous stranger – Redundant phrase. You don’t need anonymous. Ex: The last act introduced an anonymous cast to the plot. Better:The last act introduced a stranger to the plot.
  • Armed gunman – Redundant phrase. You don’t need armed. Ex: Armed gunmen are dropped onto the stage. Better: Gunmen are dropped onto the stage. 
  • As being – Flabby expression. You don’t need being. Ex: The playwright is known as being an expert on translations. Better: The playwright is known as an expert on translations.
  • As far as I’m concerned – Empty Phrase. Don’t use it. Ex: As far as I’m concerned, all comedians are nervous before a show. Better: All comedians are nervous before a show.
  • At this point in time – Empty Phrase. Don’t use or fix. Ex: At this point in time, the director is a world expert on musicals. Better: The director is a world expert on musicals.
  • Bald-headed – Redundant phrase. You don’t need headed. Ex: The character was bald-headed. Better: The character was bald.
  • Blend together – Redundant phrase. You don’t need together. Ex: The lighting colors blend together nicely. Better: The lighting colors blend nicely.
  • Cameo appearance – Redundant phrase. You don’t need appearance. Ex: The actor’s cameo appearance caused a riot. Better: The actor’s cameo caused a riot.
  • Crisis situation – Redundant phrase. You don’t need situation. Ex: In the crisis situation the lead character tried to relax and think clearly. Better: In the crisis the lead character tried to relax and think clearly.
  • Current trend – Redundant phrase. You don’t need current. Ex: Some say absurd theatre is a current trend that won’t last. Better: Some say absurd theatre is a trend that won’t last.
  • Descend down – Redundant phrase. You don’t need down. Ex: After the murder the heroine descended down the steps to exit the building. Better: After the murder the heroine descended the steps to exit the building.
  • Emergency situation – Redundant phrase. You don’t need Ex: The plot is based on an emergency situation at a hospital. Better: The plot is based on an emergency at a hospital.
  • Enter in – Redundant phrase. You don’t need Ex: The designer lets the viewer enter in an enchanted forest. Better: The designer lets the viewer enter an enchanted forest.
  • Equal to one another – Redundant phrase. You don’t need to one another. Ex: The two guitarists are equal to one another in talent. Better: The two guitarists are equal in talent.
  • Final conclusion – Redundant phrase. You don’t need final. Ex: He came to a final conclusion that he hated his job. Better: He came to a conclusion that he hated his job. Best: He concluded that he hated his job.
  • Finally – Weak linking term. Be more precise. Ex: Finally, the actor got the job done. Better: After five attempts, the actor got the job done.
  • Fly/flew through the air – Redundant phrase. You don’t need through the air. Ex: The trapeze artist flew through the air above us. Better: The trapeze artist flew above us.
  • Frequently – Imprecise Phrase. Use something more specific. Ex: The dancers frequently change costumes. Better: The dancers change costumes for every new song.
  • Give in – Weak phrasal verb. Use concede, or quit. Ex: The main character does not give in. Better: The main character does not quit.
  • Join together – Redundant phrase. You don’t need Ex: The two trapeze artists join together as one. Better: The two trapeze artists join as one.
  • Joint collaboration – Redundant phrase. You don’t need Ex: The joint collaboration between writer and musician is a success. Better: The collaboration between writer and musician is a success.
  • Most unique – Redundant phrase. You don’t need Ex: The music is most unique. Better: The music is unique.
  • Not honest – Avoid using negative constructions if possible. Try to say what something is instead. Ex: The main character is not honest. Better: The main character is dishonest.
  • Passing fad – Redundant phrase. You don’t need Ex: Having the house lights on during a dance show is a passing fad. Better: Having the house lights on during a dance show is a fad.
  • Pick up on – Flabby phrase. Use notice, or sense Ex: He didn’t pick up on the subtle nuances. Better: He didn’t notice the subtle nuances.
  • Present time – Redundant phrase. You don’t need Ex: The lead actor is not available at the present time. Better: The lead actor is not available at present.
  • Start off/out – Redundant phrase. You don’t need off/out. Ex: Let me start off by saying this show is world class. Better: Let me start by saying this show is world class.
  • Surrounded on all sides – Redundant phrase. You don’t need on all sides. Ex: The hero was surrounded on all sides by enemies. Better: The hero was surrounded by enemies.
  • Very – Flabby modifier. Use a stronger word that very is modifying. Ex: I was very scared when he pulled out a dagger. Better: I was petrified when he pulled out a dagger.
  • When it comes to – Flabby phrase. Use when, with or delete the phrase instead. Ex: When it comes to casting Shakespeare, you must choose actors wisely. Better: When casting Shakespeare, you must choose actors wisely.
  • You’re going to – Flabby phrase. Use you’ll instead. Ex: You’re going to love this play. Better: You’ll love this play.

 

2 Grammar Check

Make it easy by finding out your favourite online resource to help with this.

Try out these –

http://www.kokedit.com/ckb.php

http://grammar.about.com/

http://www.grammarphobia.com

http://www.copyediting.com/home

And of course Word has an amazing ability to flag up grammar that isn’t working out on a document.

Check the tense is the same all the way through the review

Check the verb ending agrees with the noun

The theatre curtains close (not closes) to mark a dramatic ending

To give your review the best dramatic impact avoid the passive voice and give every object an action.

The lead actor falls into the gutter and keeps dancing

Is better for an impact on the reader, taking them to experience the show other than

The gutter is dived into by the lead actor.

Make the subject act on the verb.

Make your verbs stronger by spotting ‘very’ and ‘really’ and taking them out and finding a better verb.

The last fixes are the easiest –

 

3 We need to remove words that are being used more than once

Use a thesaurus if you find that words like ‘nice’ ‘good’ ‘excellent’ ‘brilliant’ are being used more than once.

You will be surprised what interesting choices you can use instead.

 

4 Cut long sentences in two

We need to break long sentences into two so readers do not have to struggle to take in the information.

If paragraphs are just made of one long sentence see how you can break this up with semi colons ; this is a great way of making sense and not breaking your flow.

Make sure every sentence has a subject verb and noun.

 

5 We need to double check all the facts and details.

Remember one tip is – if in doubt leave it out.

If you are not 100% sure a fact is true than don’t use it.

This will create trust between you and the reader.

Feel free to cut out information that is not needed or does not support your review.

 

Discover more posts about putting more fun into your life here

 

Find out more about writing your unique review today in an easy fill in the blanks style go here for a complimentary blueprint to help you find the words to express what’s in your heart today !

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2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Fun (Malta Experience) | What's (in) the picture?

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